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, and it is a big if, the case does collapse, what will dominique strauss-kahn do next? >> there is been a sensational reaction in france today. this is a nation that was angry about the way he was paraded in the initial stages. it was not just about his reputation. it was the reputation of the nation itself that was being questioned. they were angry about headlines in the american newspapers. people are talking about a premature way justice was delivered. we have heard from deputies in parliament -- it is my sense that there has been so much said that it would be unthinkable for him to stand as the next presidential candidate for the socialist. i where his support goes, some might be candidacy. the outcome could have big implications. >> we are falling big business stories today. 17 e.u. finance ministers went, whew -- we have some time. >> greece lived through with their promise that they would pass austerity measures. the eu finance ministers will be discussing the next bailout. this tide's greece over. they are held over until september. the next big bailout will carry them through u
it's now clear big decisions will have to be made soon. >> by putting social security "on the table," the president is sort of calling the g.o.p. bluff. "okay, here is social security. i've told you medicare will be on the table. are you willing to put revenue increases on the table?" >> the white house believes a $4 trillion agreement is within reach. whether it can be reached will become much clearer this weekend. darren gersh, "nightly business report," washington. california is making progress on its rating. standard and poors today raised its outlook for the golden state from negative to stable. the reason, california was able to pass its budget on time, closing what was once a $27 billion gap. here are the stories in tonight's "n.b.r. newswheel." two encouraging reports about the job market-- payroll processing firm adp says, by its count, american businesses added 157,000 jobs in june. economists were expecting many fewer. that's encouraging for an upside surprise when the labor department reports june job numbers tomorrow. also, fewer people filed for unemployment benefits l
>> susie: a big triple-digit rally on wall street, thanks to big profits from corporate america and a breathrough in those debt talks in washington. >> tom: then, after the closing bell, apple is top banana in the company reports staggering earnings as consumers buy a record 20 million iphones. it's "nightly business report" for tuesday, july 19. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening and thanks for joining us. a banner day for blue chips. the dow surged more than 200 points, its best one-day performance this year. at the close, the dow added 202 points, the nasdaq rose 61 and the s&p 500 up 21 points. then after the bell, susie, apple did it again, posting stunning earnings. >> susie: tom, we're running out of adjectives to describe the amazing growth at apple. it earned $7.79 a share in its fiscal third quarter, crushing estimates by almost $2. revenues also came in better than expected, up 82% to $28.5 billion. and that growth comes as consumers keep s
in britain, news corp. has made big business mistakes in america. it owns dow jones -- it bought at dow jones in 2007 and two years later it was worth $2.8 billion, less than their purchase price. myspace was bought for $580 million in 2005, sold for $35 million this year. but one of their largest shareholder still has huge confidence in the company. >> you have seen a business that has evolved, moving from newspapers and to other media, and moving more fee- based business model as opposed to advertising based. i think there is an awful lot of good steps that have been made, and i am very impressed overall with the company's success. >> rupert murdoch is back in america, more comfortable perhaps in a country where big investors still back him as the chief executive. >> here is a man, even though he is 80 years old, warren buffett is 80 years old and he is doing well, sumner redstone, and these are men with long track records of great success. to not want some of that wisdom in there, i think, would be a mistake. as will rogers said, good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes
," washington. >> tom: if richard cordray is confirmed, part of his job will be checking the books of big banks. we'll get a better idea of how they're doing in the coming days when many report quarterly earnings. by the end of this week, 40% of financial firms in the s&p 500 will have reported their numbers. as a group, the results are expected to be downright awful. erika miller reports. >> reporter: banks are the heartbeat of the economy, so their health is often used as a barometer of the recovery-- and the stock market. unfortunately for investors, bank analyst jim sinegal sees plenty of uncertainties ahead. >> in addition to macroeconomic uncertainties, with unemployment high, with g.d.p. growth slow, will the banks be able to add new loans? that's number one. number two is the regulatory uncertainty. we are still not sure where capital levels are going to fall out, and how that's going to affect profitability. >> reporter: as for profitability, diversified financials are expected to be the worst performer this earnings season-- down 94%. this is the group that includes bank of america, j
. and that means that we still have a big hole to fill. gwen: who is in that big hole? and why is it that month after month, and after month, it never seems to get more shallow? >> let's go back a little ways. a few months ago, the economy seemed to be having a nice head of steam. we were seeing very strong job growth numbers of 200,000 per month. and suddenly everything seemed to hit a wall. we've had a run of bad luck. we had very bad snowstorms earlier this year, a series of natural disasters here. the big hit came from gasoline prices that shot up to around $4 for gasoline because of the libyan rebellion. and finally the japanese earthquake and tsunami turned out to be a much bigger negative for us than we may have appreciated. because it cut off the flow of vital parts. put all those things together and it cost a lot of momentum. may very poor job numbers and in june, very poor job numbers. it was kind of surprising because in fact over the last few weeks, we had a wave of optimism because some of those tempering negatives seemed to be going away. as gasoline prices dropped and japan got b
today for as big a deficit agreement as possible. that will require leadership and hard decisions, the president said, and not just from politicians. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: before he sat down with congressional leaders, the president said both parties talk tough about fixing the nation's debt problems, but they still aren't willing to come to the table and make hard sacrifices. and he added another group to that list: the nation's business leaders. >> the business community is a lot like everybody else, which is we want to cut everybody else's stuff and we want to keep our stuff. we want to cut our taxes, but if you want to raise revenue with somebody else's taxes, that's okay. and that kind of mindset is why we never get the problem solved. >> reporter: but house speaker john boehner says there is a reason businesses shouldn't be asked to give more now. >> our disagreement with the president is not about closing loopholes. none of us are fond of loopholes. our disagreement is over the idea of raising taxes on the very people that we're asking to create jobs in our cou
trillion over the next ten years or a big budget deal, $4 trillion with tax increases also over the next ten years. do these scenarios fill out a possibility or are they off the table. >> i think it's still going to ultimately be one of those three buckets. there's the first model which is basically politicians come together, can't hash out a deal and put in budget profits reform with targets where they'll come up with savings later or some kind of spending tax, promising to cut spending but they don't still in the policy. that's probably too close to what we've seen in the past or politicians say they'll do something but they'll get specific about how. the other two deals are more specific policy changes that will be included with the debt ceiling increase, either a smaller deal in the neighborhood how far 1 to $2 trillion dollars and stays away from the hard issues, no taxes, no social security or healthcare or the big deal we've been calling it to fix the deficit in this situation. that's what president obama and leader boehner have talked about. that's the group of senators the gage
, i think first of all the president realizes we have to get a big deal. as we discussed a couple of weeks ago or last week, charlie, if you don't send the appropriate signal to international financial communities, you can raise the debt ceiling but the interest costs are going to go through the roof. so it has to be a big deal and so i think he recognizes that. and i think speaker boehner subpoena looking at the reality of what's going to happen in 2013 without agreeing to what the president said. we're going to have 4.9% increases on taxes on everybody earning er $200,000 a year anyway just from the affordabl care act. so you'll see significant increase in taxes withoutany increased taxes put on the table. i think they can do a deal and i think a deal can get done if, in fact, we do take away a lot of the tax eendires and lower the rates so thatwe get an economic boom that would come a that. so i think it's still possible. i think things tend to happen in washington when they have to so my slope that something will come togher and occur. >> rose: how long do you think it will ta
carry out india's worst militant attack since 2008? big dreams from a tiny island. one of the world's smallest countries hoping for olympic success. hello. it could be another landmark moment in the phone-hacking scandal. we should know very seen whether the media tycoon rupert murdoch has agreed to be questioned by members of british parliament. his son, james, and rebecca brooks have also been invited to appear before the hearing. we can go live to westminster. it feels like we're on the deadline hour for learning whether rupert murdoch is going to say yea or nay to appearing. i don't suppose many are expecting him to say oh, go on then. >> i don't think so. for one thing, the parliamentary committees do not have the same powers as congressional committees and certainly they cannot force foreign citizens like rupert and james murdoch to appear before them. there is even a question mark over whether they can really force rebecca brooks, who of course is a british citizen to appear. if anyone buzz does of the three, it is thought that perhaps she will be the most likely. the lawyers
of winning back the house, they don't want to go there. republicans have a big flank of new members elected on a pledge of no new taxes. nobody is dealing with reality. anybody on this panel, two of us could make a deal, but they cannot. >> why can they not make a deal, charles? >> you saw it in the clip you showed. nancy pelosi is the classic definition of a reaction. liberal. no changes in programs, entitlements. -- classic definition of a reactionary at liberal. no genocide programs, entitlements. if you all make -- note changes in programs, entitlements. if you don't make changes, he will wreck the economy, and everybody over the age of nine knows that. is that they are not willing to means test -- if they are not willing to means test entitlements, which you think and liberal alike, who always argue in terms of sharing the sacrifice and the rich bearing the burden, nothing will happen. >> colby? >> you just had exhibit number one of why they have not been able to reach a deal, as my friend charles expressed. if you start out with nancy pelosi and the position of republicans on tax incr
to more than two or three people. if you are talking to an audience, a big audience in a theater or a movie audience, but with television, if there are more than two or three people in the room, they're talking to each other, they're not listening to you. that camera lens became sitting and like talking to you. that is what i loved about it. tavis: there is some much stuff in this book, and there are several things i found fascinating and funny. fascinating, you apparently love crossword puzzles. >> absolutely addicted. i carry them around my purse. i am stuck on the one, the car driving me here, about halfway through but i did not finish. i said i will finish on the way back. tavis: how did you develop a love for the crosswords? >> i don't know, i love words. i am not into numbers that much, and there are people looked on that, but crossword puzzles. if i get a puppy and a paper trained him, all of a sudden i would open the paper and would be a cross word, no, you cannot go on that. tavis: are you pretty good a crossword puzzles? >> i am not a wizard, but i do them so much, pret
, the risk of a u.s. default is also a big worry for many older americans. they're conditioned about their monthly social security payments. now we placed several unanswered calls expecting social security checks on august 3. an additional 27 million beneficiaries expect payments later in the month. we caught up with a couple of them to see what's on their minds. >> it's a scare tactic. i mean because there's so many other things that they can stop before they stop social security checks. >> whether it is the republicans or democrats win this game, you have to remember next year is an election year again. so they're posturing themselves. and they're playing a game that is kind of tough. but again they have to get something passed sooner or later. >> susie: so far, the treasury has not provided details on how the government will decide which bills to pay if the borrowing limit is not raised. executives from the country's biggest banks met today with treasury officials in new york ahead of tuesday's deadline. they discussed how debt auctions would be handled if congress fails to raise
. trading volume was light. 770 million shares on the big board, 1.6 billion on the nasdaq. despite today's job worries and a shortened trading week, the dow was positive on the week rising 0.6%. the nasdaq gained better than 1.5% since last friday. and the s&p 500 also ticked a fraction higher, up 0.3% on the week. >> susie: that dismal jobs report has everyone asking-- how do we fix the problem? joining us with some thoughts mark zandi chief economist at moody's analytics. >> mark. >> hi, susie. >> how do we put americans back to work? >> well, i think this will put the onus back on congress and the administration to do at least a few more things to try to help the job market the next 6-12 months. one would be to extend the current payroll-tax holiday which if there is no legislation will expire at the end of this year, so that's a likely thing they could do. there is also a suggestion of providing more help to state and local governments. as you know, as we see in today's job numbers a big chunk of the jobs lost is occurring at state and local governments under pressure and cutting job
economy and do what's best for our people. >> tom: the president aims for a big budget deal, not a stopgap measure, before the end of the month. it's "nightly business report" for tuesday, july 5. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening and thanks for joining us. with the united states rapidly running out of borrowing room, the president is calling on republicans and democrats to move quickly. mr. obama has called leaders from both parties to the white house for a meeting thursday and susie, he's urging them to think big. >> susie: tom, with the calendar pressuring politicians to negotiate a plan allowing the u.s. to borrow more money, the president wants a deal cut in a few weeks and says it should not be a temporary one lasting only a few months. >> tom: the budget bargaining now heads to the white house with less than a month before time runs out. darren gersh reports. >> rep
scale, he tried, he went for something big and failed. >> boehner is clearly on board for something. but i think right now the other four lders are trying to figure out is this politically where we want to go and can we assemble the votes for something of this magnitude. >> we conclude by turning to the n.b.a. and n.f.l. labor disputes with sally jenkins of the "washington post" and kevin blackistone of the university of maryland and espn. >> maybe it's time for fans to reassess why they're spending like crack addicts on the four major sports when there are lots of other affordable, available things to watch for a lot less money that appreciate the fans perhaps a little bit better and who value the fan more properly. >> with the n.f.l., it's very much reflective to me of what we're going through in america right now where in 201 you've had record profits in corporate america yet corporate america points to the economy, says it niece bad shape and pois to unions and workers and asks for concessions. that's the exact same thing going on in the n.f.l. when you talk about $9 billion in
in three weeks the president continued to press for a big deal to raise the debt ceiling and to reduce the deficit by $4 trillion. >> i am still pushing for us to achieve a big deal. but what i also said to the group is if we can't do the biggest deal possible, then let's still be ambitious. let's still try to at least get a down payme on deficit reduction. we are obviously running out of time. and so what i have said to the members of congress is that you need over the next 24 to 36 hours to give me some sense of whayour plan is to get the debt ceiling rais through whatever mechanisms they can think about and show me a plan in tes of what you are doing for deficit and debt reduction. if they show me a serious plan, i'm readyo move. even if it requires some toh decisions on my part. and i'm hopeful that over the next couple of days 'll see this long jam broken because the american people i think understandably want toee washgton do its job. >> president obama ruled out a 2.4 trillion plan prosed by house republicans. >> in my expectation is that you will probably see the house vote on
&p 500 down about six points. the losses came on heavier trading volume-- 923 million shares on the big board and over two billion on the nasdaq. >> susie: joining us now to put all these developments in perspective, mohamed el-erian, c.e.o. and co-chief investment officer of pimco, the world's largest bond fund. >> a lot to talk about. >> there's a lot >> susie: let me begin with the fed. do you think the fed is going to come out with another round of stimulus? is it a good thing? >> well, they're divided. in the minutes some people said perhaps we need more stimulus. others said oh, no, not too fast. worry about inflation. i think what the fed is telling us for sure is two things. one is revised downward growth projection, not just for 2011, but 2012, tells us that the slow down is more than cyclical. second to they're acknowledging they're driving in the fog. there's a lot of disagreement as to what the outlook looks like, and whether policy should be changed or not. so basically what they're telling us is, we will act. we just don't know what we're going to do. >> susie: is this a g
denies any personal involvement in this but we did see a quite a bad part of strategy until the other big company was brought in. >> yes. a p.r. crisis from the beginning for news international and news corp. matthew freud does deny any involvement in it, and i think he tries to keep away from it being married to rupert murdoch's daughter. there are big global p.r. networks. so they should have an effect. >> thank you for speaking with us on that. and naomi is with us. in the next hour or so. hour and a half, we are expecting to see the prime minister who still is facing quite a difficult political hurdle on this, because questions emerged further about his links with former news international employees. >> yes. this basically comes down to a question of judgment. that's why david david cameron is under more pressure than he's come under in the last year. the question of whether he did proper checks on the former editor of the "news of the world" before he decided to hire him, and more and more people have come to light over the past couple of weeks saying they warned david cameron of the
as legal. ceremonies were held from manhattan to nighing a ray falls. >> last-minute captures on the big day. same-sex couples sweltering in the heat. >> with the celebration comes spending. it's thought same-sex marriages will boost the country by $3 million over the next three years. a handful of states have legalized same-sex marriage and new york is the one that will draw in the crowds. a destination in its own right. -- in its own rite. >> mark mattias had his cupcakes at the ready. his customers in this predominantly gay area of manhattan are now planning their weddings. >> roughly 50% of our business is weddings and we're expecting a big boost in revenue due to same-sex couples's weddings. >> the federal government here doesn't recognize these weddings. >> if one of us should pass away, the other cannot get social security and with regard to finances and taxes, we're not just treated the same as a heterosexual coup. >> whatever the picture at the national level, new york is welcoming same-sex couples with open arms, and after years of waiting, newlyweds are ready to throw the ulti
will have consumption and demand big enough to help continue, assuming the political environment is stable, not only into the country, but around it. i know you interviewed secretary kissinger on china. that is the number one fear. the number one fear is the stability, either inside or outside of china, will not be good. if the condition remains like it is today, not to mention there are a lot of flash points out there -- you heard the latest news about the china sea issues. there are a lot of issues going around. but assuming the leadership in china is able to manage all that and one would hope that they could and one would have high hopes that they would, this to growth will go on for two days to three decades. but the first statement you made in the show, i actually think that, as americans, i am always a positive thinker, as you know -- i think we're just going through relativity. we are relatively speaking not seeing what we have seen in the last 20 years are 25 years. going forward, there needs to be structural changes, reinventing ourselves, but you still -- china came from nothing.
that is high cotton. you're hanging out with tom hanks and julia roberts. >> that is big time. they have an entourage. they are walking around with their cert. i have two image awards. mine are heavier. tavis: tell me about this character that you play in "larry crowne". neighbor.s larry's he is the big time dude in the neighborhood because he won the lottery. they have a daily are still. tavis: a daily yard sale? >> so i am having with people and that is my thing. throughout the movie. i am trying to be people with the price. i do not care. you are trying to buy an old speed racer lunchbox, i am trying to get $100. tavis: did you ever do the yard sale thing? >> i would like to go buy them sometimes to see what people have but if never tried to sell my old stuff. i have a yard sale, here they come. get the good stuff out there. tavis: i was about to ask, if you had a yard sale, what do you have to put on display? >> it is always a little recycling, clothing and suits and the kind of thing. some golf and equipment. i have a lot of golf clubs i would give away. and you give away the kids'
off 7.5 points. volume was light, 762 million shares moving on the big board and 1.6 billion shares traded on the nasdaq. >> susie: investors may have a long list of worries, but it's hard to tell looking at the flurry of new stock offerings this week. they include dunkin brands, the parent of dunkin' donuts, which is also the week's largest deal. if all twelve companies on the calendar go public, it will be the best showing in almost five years. erika miller looks at what's behind this trend and what it means for investors. >> reporter: if there's one thing the stock market hates , it's uncertainty. so why would companies like dunkin donuts rush to go public this week of all weeks? there's lots of anxiety in financial markets about raising the nation's debt ceiling. and if a deal is not reached by next week, stocks could be headed for serious trouble. but i.p.o. expert richard peterson says dunkin and others are focused on the positives. >> the conditions are ripe for companies to raise capital in this environment, where the economy is growing, albeit at a slow rate. >> reporter: d
, it actually has these built in very significant disincentives towards making big deals, towards working together. and we are now seeing the fruits of that evolution in the house in particular. let's talk about the house in particular. john boehner has been a very interesting figure in all of this. at one point he was walking in the back door of the white house and trying to cut a deal with the president. obviously, shamed out of that. so now he came up with his own deal and spent a lot of time last night bringing people in through his front door, recalcitrant republicans, to get them on board. is he wounded by what happened this week? is he strengthened? >> i think what happened this week is that we have seen how little leverage and how weak john boehner really is. you know, he has a leadership style that he has said, you know, after the top-down leadership style we saw with nancy pelosi, that he wanted to be a consensus leader, that things would come from the bottom up and he won his majority in the house because a lot of these freshmen ran specifically against the establishment and ag
have overinterpreted the mandate from 2010. so we will have a big debate in 2012. there's no question about that. and an important debate. but i'm not sure that the voters will resolve it finally so that whoever is in power in 2013 can be able to go in the direction that they say they wt to. >> if you don't get the debt problem resolved, he knows it's going to nip at his heels at ever turn, no longer how long he's president of the united states. that's the underlying problem. even if you get to that point, there's a disagreement, i think, ideologically about what the government's role ought to be in that kind of economic policy. >>e continue this evening the documentary filmmaker and photographer with interesting ideas, not only about filmmaking, but also interviewing. >> i don't think that i discover that isn't there already. i would, again, describe it differently. i would say it's a desire, not to impose some idea of what a person is like on the movie that i'm making, but a process of discovery, of trying to uncover, in some way, something new, something interesting, something vita
the roof of the microsoft campus. this is second only to their headquarters. the big cities are already jammed and in the next 10 years, they expect the largest internal migration in history there is a downside to all of this gallup and growth and you can see it, a thicket ago, bikes dominated the streets. today, everyone would like a car. -- a decade ago, bikes dominated the streets. the government has limited car ownership but in that edict might be too little, too late. the growth model could derail all of the economic gains of the past two decades. and this is a part in the heart of shanghai. three years ago, this is little more than an urban jump that was left behind when the world expo site was left behind and gutted. kongjian yu is the founder of turenscape, one of the most acclaimed design firms. he is an advocate for environmental sustainability and was brought in literally to change the landscape. >> every contaminated water and soil. in china, 75% of the water. all of the major leagues in china and the rivers, this runs through the city's and they have been contaminated. we d
not want to use a file to investigate it. >> how big a day is this today? >> it is a big day for parliament to make sure they can answer the questions. powerand get subpoena back in the committees. >> all things were joining us. -- thanks for joining us. [unintelligible] these pictures have come in the last hour or so. a public-relations company has been brought into news corp. is helping murdock prepare for this. it seems to have changed their approach. from rupert murdoch said there were only minor problems and told this to american news -- newspapers. but in britain, he apologized to the british public for the hacking scandal. the real question is what will be amended in a select committee today on questions on whether or not there was a cover-up. this has shaken many of the foundations of the british political scale. >> four decades, -- for decades, rupert murdoch has towered over britain's. but what will remain of him? has this shifted the balance between politicians and media in britain? >> the relationship became too close. we all want the support of newspaper groups and broadcasting
shot and a childhood. we really became brothers as opposed to big brother, little brother just hanging around and doing stuff. we have never really thought about the racial element as something that was anything but a binder. tavis: it was not just a relationship between you and michael but you ended up bringing on -- let me put it this way, his immediate family ended up being your extended family. they came to live with you at a certain point. >> a year after i met him, social services was considering taking the kids away from their mom. there was all kinds of abuse. what i did is that i took the three oldest children and they came and live with me in an apartment in south philadelphia for the summer. i don't know how to cook or do anything. it was chaos. i don't know if it was worse or better for them. tavis: [laughter] it might have been worse. >> they remember the smallest details. we all pitched in to get there. it was no big brother, little brother, we were all the managers of that apartment. her mom finally got her act together and got into subsidized housing. that was the end f
the markets. >> europe's leaders know they have to get over big political differences if the greek problem is to be solved. >> leaders have to raise above their domestic political agenda, and they will. proposals of the euro group on measures that will risk contagion in your area are you are intelligently needed. >> the fact they are still talking about proposals is surely alarming. this crisis is 18 months old now and investors may be losing patience. matthew price, "bbc news," brussels. >> feels like everyone is losing patience. the ireland situation, junk bond status according to moody. >> yes. the credit rating is now down junk status and by doing these cuts, moody's is doing -- showing that they need to agree and bring in a proper fix for this debt crisis, but it also raise this is discrepancy among the rating agencies. stacey dugard and fitch have ireland raised three notches above jupping status and moody's not only did they downgrade them to junk status but said there could be further doubts come. but the problem for poor ireland, they'll likely be forced to get rid of those bonds,
, but when i got together with the cast. family dinner is a big part of our show. the first thing we shot on the pilot, the first day, was the family dinner scene. we had to kind of pretend we had a relationship, but they are so good, these actors, and having done a long series, they are also so good as people. they are people i want to spend some time with. tavis: i had no idea your first answer would include a comment about those family dinners. as is often the case, i am in my dressing room and my producer an assistant, everyone in that room said the best thing about the show in every episode, you guys meet around the dinner table. it is a powerful thing. what do you make of that? >> i think there is a cultural thing, not only in this country but probably throughout the world. everybody did not have a family like the ravens. everybody did not have that opportunity. but they had family or wish they had that output. it is an adult family drama. family drama usually involves an argument, which is siblings and parents and kids. i think the real secret to it is the show has a very procedura
struggling. on top of the eurozone is a big market for u.s. multinational firms. so, it's no wonder that economist bruce kasman says it's really bad timing for a rate hike in europe. >> the euro area as a region delivers less in terms of growth as it could in helping the global economy, and then finally it adds risks and vulnerabilities to the really tough adjustments going on in greece and other peripheral countries right now. to be sure, a quarter of a percentage point increase in european rates tomorrow is likely to have only a nominal effect on u.s. growth. the concern is that the european central bank will proceed down a path of tighter monetary policy. >> the step that will be taken tomorrow by itself is not that big a deal, but the signal, if it gets realized in terms of further movements over the next six to 12 months, could have an impact in making it a little harder for the u.s. to get growth than it otherwise would. >> reporter: the good news is that buyers of u.s. stocks don't appear to be troubled by higher interest rates in other areas of the world. equity strategist a
points of a plan-- no details. but what we can probably gather from this plan-- it has big tax increases in it and all the spending cuts will happen in the out years. well, how many times do politicians think they can pull that one over on the american people? >> reporter: the split among republicans made it difficult for party leaders to determine just what might pass the house. whatever it turns out to be, it still must be acceptable to senate democrats and ultimately to the president. this morning, the senate's majority leader democrat harry reid challenged house speaker john boehner to take matters in hand. >> right now, i'm at a point where we need to hear from the house of representatives. we've planned to go forward over here, but until we hear from the house all our work is for naught. i await word from the speaker. >> reporter: in the meantime, there's general agreement that translating the complex gang of six plan into legislation and votes before august second, is likely unrealistic. that could put the short-term emphasis back on a senate backup plan to let the president raise
of either of our two parties right now. and i think that is the big challenge right now. how do we basically develop a political platform and a mandate to do those four things. >> i would add a couple things. to what tom said which i basically agree with. but first there is a cultural element here. it's not just a problem in washington, it's a pblem in the culture. a nation where people have distrust of authority, don't trust government, unwilling to accept sacrice, feel very threatened, want pore government than they are willing to pay for, and so there has to be a gigantic education campaign to go under that. and then the second thing i would add, and tom talked about a hybrid politics, i uld say we'vead it. and we just have to rediscover it. and i go back perpeally to my hero alex aner hamilton who created this hrid politics it was not -- he got us out of the big government versus small government debat he stood for lited b energetic government to enhance social mobility. so people in the hamiltonian practise decision which include the wig party and the lincoln an republican party at the
be a big deal if the u.s. government couldn't pay its debts but i don't think that's where we're going to end up. we're not greece. greece is a small economy, greece is way, way deeper in hot than we are. people have lots of options where to put money and greece is low on their list because they think there's going to be a default. where the greece metaphor comes in is that greece and portugal and spain and ireland have raised questions about whether governments keep their promises. and to the extent that the congress and the president can agree on a long run fiscal plan, it raises the question of, are we ever going to get our act together so that we don't become greece? >> and is the market yet or do you suspect it will either price this in or panic? >> it's been amazing how calm the markets have been and i think there are two reasons for that. one is, they kind of assume that eventually washington will do what it has to do. and secondly, greece and europe have been such a preoccupation that nobody wants to have money there, so they've moved money to the u.s. as europe has done its ev
and protecting itself. >> to which one answer might be "so why is it so big?" i mean, it is a vast territorial power which has, of course, significant ethnic minorities. they have large territories. >> rose: so you're suggesting that there is a history of chinese imperialism and any other historian who suggests that... >> no, no. i think that henry kissinger is clearly right. that it is not an eansionist power inhe sense thatfor exame, russia was. expanding constantly but i think... >> rose: and certain after the war. >> but i think that what you see already is a chinese strategic doctrine and kissinger, i think, would not dispute this which stakes an ambitious claim to a spheref influence as we rightly said and that would provoke conflict so i i think we're entering very very difficult times >> rose: well, your oxford colleague neil ferguson suggests that nationalistic forces will overwhelm and that there will be a conflict between... in some way between the united states and china. >> well any historian who has looked at the history of the rise and fall of great powers would say such shifts
a big jobs generator, the place they call the space coast. but in particular today i spent some time talking with travis thompson who has spent 33 years here at the kennedy space center working on the shuttle program. he is the lead technician on the clogout crew, the guys who button them up, the astronauts, strap them in, shut the door and send them off to space. he and his team, it was a very emotional day for them. as they were finishing up their job they had put together a series of cards with messages talking about their appreciation for the program, their patted rotism and frankly -- patriotism and their sadness, and the final word was god bless america, held by travis thompson himself. this is travis thompson's last day on the job, after 100 shuttle missions, getting the crews strapped in and ready to go to space, tomorrow he has no job. where he is going to go to work. as he said, my job is putting human beings in spacecraft to go to space. i don't see a lot of prospects for doing that somewhere else. so it is a poignant moment for him. >> so finally, miles, look back with us
, materials. >> that money could make a big difference to a lot of people. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: high-level democrats and republicans alike said today's meeting at the white house marked the beginning of the end game in reaching a final deal on deficit reduction. the president and congressional leaders convened in the white house cabinet room, amid talk of a grand bargain involving social security, medicare and tax reform. when it was over, mr. obama made an unscheduled appearance in the briefing room. >> i thought it was a very constructive meeting. people were frank. we discussed the various options available to us. everybody re-confirmed the importance of completing our work and raising the debt limit ceiling so that the full faith and
was the big question. it was cleveland himself who recommended going on a boat. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> well, the best companies are driven by new ideas. >> our history depends on new ideas. we spend billions on advanced technologies. >> it's all about investing in the future. >> we can find new energy-- more cleaner, safer and smarter. >> collaborating with the best in the field. >> chevron works with the smartest people at leading universities and tech companies. >> and yet, it's really basic. >> it's paying off everyday. and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: senate democrats vowed to stay in session around the clock to resolve the debt crisis. house republicans modified their plan
, with the big board trading over one billion shares, nasdaq volume 2.4 billion. the economy worsened in about half the country in recent weeks due to weak home sales and signs of a slowdown in manufacturing. a federal reserve survey out today shows seven of the fed's 12 bank regions reported slower growth. and in another sign of new weakness in the economy, the commerce department says there were fewer orders of aircraft, autos, heavy machinery and computers last month. orders for durable goods fell by 2%. >> reporter: i'm diane eastabrook in orion township, michigan. still ahead, i'll tell you how general motors plans to make money selling this small car with help from the u.a.w. >> susie: can you say $1,630 an ounce? that's the new record for gold prices set today, before the precious metals encountered selling. in new york trading, gold futures lost $2 to settle at $1,617 an ounce. but, as suzanne prt reports, gold prices could continue to shine on. >> reporter: at morningstar's jewelers and pawnbrokers in hollywood, florida, business is sparkling. but, it's business from customers looking
exposure to italian paper. even american banks have almost $300 billion. is italy too big to fail? >> well, certainly it is. i mean, if you have to think about a rescue package for italy no one today has the money to put it up. i mean, let's face it, as you said before, italy is six times the size of greece. so i think that everybody should be quite calm. today the markets were doing much better. it's true, as ken was saying before, part of the confusion arose because of a fight over an internal political fight between berlusconi and finance minister tremonte. but the decree for a large austerity plan was already passed. and it was because of this fight that the markets feared that maybe this decree was not going to be approved by parliament. today the situation has been clarified. by friday this package will be passed and, you know, italy is going to go on by adopting this plan and by 2014 it will have a balanced budget which is going to be quite an enviable situation if all of this will go according to plan. >> suarez: professor rogoff, the news of the austerity plan seemed to have calme
a big difference to a lot of people. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the debt ceiling deadlock in washington led to increasingly urgent appeals for action today. but even as talks resumed, white house officials warned not to expect a hallelujah moment. fresh alarms sounded on wall street and around the world today about the consequences of a potential u.s. government default. standard & poors joined moody's in warning the country's credit rating could be downgraded, if the government tries to pay just the interest on its debt. and china said it hopes the u.s. adopts responsible policies. the chinese hold more than $1 trillion in u.s. debt, more than any other foreign creditor. at a senate hearing, federal reserve chairman ben bernanke-- t
for the auto industry. we examine the new round of labor talks between the u.a.w. and detroit's big three. >> ifill: ray suarez gets an update on the turmoil in libya. >> brown: and we close with a paul solman story about a convicted murderer and middle school dropout who now makes $80,000 a year after completing college while behind bars. >> these are my dreams. i fit in right here, but this is what i'm looking at, this is where i want to be, this is where i can be, this is where i deserve to be. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> i mean, where would we be without small businesses? >> we need small businesses. >> they're the ones that help drive growth. >> like electricians, mechanics, carpenters. >> they strengthen our communities. >> every year, chevron spends billions with small businesses. that goes right to the heart of local communities, providing jobs, keeping people at work. they depend on us. >> the economy depends on them. >> and we depend on them. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting scie
in damascus. >> it's the highest lottery prize ever offered in european history. >> perhaps with a big lottery win you buy a flash supercar or maybe perhaps a luxury home, possibly even a never-ending holiday of a lifetime. but better yet, what about buying the whole lot? because if you win the euro millions this week, there's no doubt you could afford it all. across europe, ticket sales are soaring, from spain to switzerland, ireland to france, people all over are trying their luck at winning the 185 million euro jackpot. this store in belgium, for instance, has seen an unprecedented surge of wannabe winners. >> i think it's one of the best weeks of the year. people came on more, and we're expecting the crazy day. >> the highest ever lottery win on european soil was in italy's super lotto two years ago. back then, one lucky ticket netted just under 148 million euros, but if tonight's jackpot is won by a single winner, that record will be smashed. but it won't just be good news for that person. the rules of euro millions don't allow the jackpot to grow beyond the 185 million euro, so any extra
to the business, it's search! >> tom: corporate earnings season heats up with big numbers from google and a healthy quarter from j.p. morgan. it's "nightly business report" for thursday, july 14. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening and thanks for joining us. almost $7 billion in sales equals another blockbuster quarter for google, a blowout beginning to earnings for technology companies. susie, internet search and search advertising continue driving the big profits at the web giant. >> susie: tom, google's earnings surged almost 40% and google stock soared as well, up over $60 or 12% after the closing bell. google earned $8.74 a share in the second quarter, about $1 more than analyst estimates. google continued its hiring blitz, adding 2,400 employees during the quarter. paid clicks, or the number of times internet users clicked on the company's ads, rose 18%, in line w
, to the red, white, and blue. in the big apple and elsewhere, the day will end with the usual bursts of color, lighting the night sky-- a once-a-year moment, cherished by millions. but, in some places, this year, the sky will be silent. raging wildfires and dry weather in arizona, new mexico, and texas have forced authorities to cancel fourth of july fireworks in certain areas. >> a lot of people are going to be really disappointed, i thinkç >> woodruff: the patriotic spirit isn't felt only in the united states. these u.s. soldiers stationed in southeastern afghanistan held a flag raising ceremony to commemorate the 4th. and at kandahar airfield general david petraeus spent his last independence day as commander of u.s. and nato forces in afghanistan, with the troops. petraeus set to take up his new job as c.i.a. director later this year, today administered the oath of re-enlistment to 235 service members.çç >> you can really feel the honor, especially when you get a general like general petreas come down and do it for us. it makes it really feel a lot more important to me. it'll be nice
of the supplies a grower might need, everything but pot itself. but, for mann and peterson, the big prize was across the bay in oakland, where, that same summer, the city was making headlines with a bold new plan. >> oakland could soon become the first city in the country to make growing pot in large warehouses legal. >> last night, oakland becoming the first city to authorize industrial-scale farms to grow medical marijuana... >> montgomery: oakland's idea was to auction off four licenses for massive indoor grow facilities to supply the state's medical marijuana dispensaries, the first official experiment with industrial-scale pot production in the country. ( applause ) oakland city officials were feeling pretty confident about the plan. in october, at the opening of the we grow marijuana superstore, the main candidates for mayor were running hard on the economics of pot production. >> people often ask me how much taxes do we get currently? under the current system, we're getting just under a million dollars in taxes... sales tax for the medical marijuana. but when the production facilit
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